COMMON GROUND BLOG

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Few Preharvest Worries this Year

Corn progress is close to or slightly behind average, while soybeans are ahead of average as of September 20, according to USDA’s weekly Crop Progress report. The state-by-state numbers suggest there’s likely to be little concern about early frost, although Iowa is well behind average for the percent of mature corn at only 49 percent.

In the 18 major states, 94 percent is in the dent state, compared with a 93 percent average. Fifty-three percent is mature, three points behind average. Only 10 percent has been harvested, compared with a 15 percent average. The table shows USDA/NASS numbers for the states served by Farm Credit Services of America (FCSAmerica). Red denotes behind average progress; green, ahead of average.

Condition is unchanged from the prior week.

CORN

Dent stage

Mature

Harvested

Poor / Very Poor

Good / Excellent

(Percents)

9/20

Avg.

9/20

Avg.

9/20

Avg.

 

 

18 States

94

93

53

56

10

15

10

68

Iowa

95

95

49

61

2

9

5

79

Nebraska

93

97

47

48

5

9

7

74

South Dakota

90

92

45

43

2

7

4

77

 

Soybeans 

Soybean harvest in the 18 states is 7 percent complete, right on average. Only 1 percent of Iowa’s crop has been harvested (average, 4 percent); Nebraska, 3 percent (average, 2 percent); South Dakota, 3 percent (average, 7 percent).

However, leaf drop is six points ahead of average, at 56 percent for the 18 states. Iowa is at 48 percent versus a 42 percent average; Nebraska, 65 versus 47 percent; and South Dakota, 73 versus 71 percent.

Crop Insurance Matters

With harvest beginning in spotty areas, FCSAmerica specialists remind growers that any remaining old-crop in the bin has to be measured before commingling new crop. Any farm-stored production in a loss situation should have a bin measurement prior to feeding, even if it has been weighed.

If you have any concerns about quality due to toxins, it is critical you have the grain sampled and tested before harvest.

Keep production records by unit/section and if you are selling grain, it needs to be under the same name and share as it was insured or indemnities can be denied.

Remember, the harvest price for corn and beans is determined during the month of October, so price-based indemnities won’t be known until November. 

If you haven’t paid premiums for spring policies, you have until the end of September to do so before interest begins. In some areas, hail premiums are due in October.

Fall crop closing date is Sept. 30, and if you haven’t already looked at the Yield Exclusion option on wheat, contact your crop insurance specialist. It is available on wheat in some counties this year. The same deadline applies to the new Margin Protection coverage for spring-planted corn and beans in Iowa, and spring wheat in South Dakota. Finally, even if you earlier elected a farm program, you have to enroll for 2016 at FSA by the end of September.  

Call your Farm Credit Services of America crop insurance specialist right away with any questions.

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FCSAmerica serves farmers, ranchers, agribusinesses and rural residents in Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota and Wyoming. For inquiries outside this geography, use the Farm Credit Association Locator  to contact your local office.